History

History 6 – provides a survey of ancient civilizations from Mesopotamia to the end of the Middle Ages. Major topics of study include Ancient Egypt, God’s covenant with Israel, the history of Asia and Africa, Ancient Greece and Rome, Mesoamerica, the Middle Ages, and the Crusades.

History 7 – a journey through time and across the globe. Beginning with the growth of towns and continuing through the Twentieth Century, these lessons provide a historical, geographical, cultural, and thematic study of the world and its people. Major areas of study include the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration, Absolutism, slavery, the Cold War, and the history of the Middle East.

History 8 – a survey of American History from the country’s settlement to the present. Major areas of study include the colonists’ struggle for independence, sectional divisions, the Civil War, and the Global Wars.

Geography – (Length 1 yr./2 credits; prerequisite: none) the study of cultural geography which includes a survey of the earth and its resources, the use of those resources, and the geographic and cultural features of people from all over the world with a strong biblical philosophy.  The course includes the study of all the world’s regions, discussing each area by physical geography, climate, economics, culture, history and government.  At the completion of the course, students will be expected to locate all fifty states on a map and name all fifty capitals.

World History – (Length 1 yr./2 credits; prerequisite: none) the study of history from early civilizations to the present through a Christian worldview.  The first semester covers such topics as:  early civilizations, the Greeks and the Romans, the Byzantine and Islamic Empires, and medieval Europe.  The second semester will cover the following topics:  Renaissance, Reformation, Exploration, Industrial Revolution and World War I and World War II.

U.S. History – (Length 1 yr./2 credits; prerequisite: none) This college preparatory course provides students with a survey of American History from the country’s settlement to the present. Major areas of study include the colonists’ struggle for independence, sectional divisions, the Civil War, and the Global Wars.

Honors U.S. History – (Length 1 yr./2 credits; prerequisite: teachers discretion) This college preparatory course provides students with a survey of American History from the country’s settlement to the present. Major areas of study include the colonists’ struggle for independence, sectional divisions, the Civil War, and the Global Wars. This will be a dual credit course taught at a faster pace than US History and more in-depth. (DUAL CREDIT)

Economics – (Length 1 sem./1 credits; prerequisite: none) a course designed to equip students with a working knowledge of basic economics with biblical principles woven through each subject area.  Topics include:  Economic models, micro and macroeconomics, the Law of Supply and Demand, economic systems, different forms of business ownership, money and the financial market.  Toward the end of the course, students will participate in a “Real Life” project that will require them to learn the following:  how to do a simple tax form, balance a checkbook, create a budget, rent an apartment, acquire insurance, etc.

Government – (Length 1 sem./1 credits; prerequisite: none) Students in this semester course of government will participate in an in-depth study of the United States government and the Constitution with a strong biblical perspective.  General objectives of this class are the following:  why government is necessary and the Christian’s relationship to government, early historical foundations, identifying the major forms of government, significance of the Constitution, organization of the political party system, and the structure and power of the three branches of government. Current event discussions are also an important aspect of the class.

Sociology – (Length 1 sem./1 credits; prerequisite: none) a one semester course that studies the structure and processes of human social behavior.  Topics include:  socialization, culture, groups, deviance, social institutions, sociological perspectives, and social change. The class also examines significant social issues through a Christian worldview including marriage and family, gender roles, social status, and race relations.

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